Author Topic: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia  (Read 3428 times)

SymbaWal

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Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« on: July 09, 2014, 02:11:09 PM »
Not sure if this has been posted here before...

So, you're feeling good after you brought home a few groceries on your Symba, huh?

If you ever wanted to see how much stuff (or how many people) could potentially be (often, very hazardously) placed on a bike that is very similar to a Symba in size and power (most of these are Honda SuperCubs or derivations of that model), check out these books, "Bikes of Burden" and "Carrying Cambodia," by Hans Kemp. I bought both and am fascinated with what I have seen. I tried to put direct links to the images, but they don't seem to work, so here's the main site just click on "Bikes Of Burden Art Prints" for the images...

http://hanskemp.photoshelter.com/
« Last Edit: July 10, 2014, 12:12:12 PM by SymbaWal »
'10 SYM Symba (light blue)
'06 Tomos Revival
'01 Tomos Targa LX
'77 Garelli SuperSport XL
'72 Honda N600 (the car; 2 cyl. 598cc air-cooled)
(former bikes: '73 Honda CT90, '91 Honda CT70)

turtle

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2014, 02:41:25 PM »
yur links are messed up

SymbaWal

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2014, 12:12:44 PM »
yur links are messed up

Thanks for letting me know, Turtle! Yeah, they didn't direct link to the images. Bummer.
'10 SYM Symba (light blue)
'06 Tomos Revival
'01 Tomos Targa LX
'77 Garelli SuperSport XL
'72 Honda N600 (the car; 2 cyl. 598cc air-cooled)
(former bikes: '73 Honda CT90, '91 Honda CT70)

AMAC1680

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2014, 03:01:09 PM »
yur links are messed up

Thanks for letting me know, Turtle! Yeah, they didn't direct link to the images. Bummer.

It's cool there is far more to that link than just scoots. Very nice.
Thanks!

Be Big,
AMAC

GLV55

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2014, 07:16:32 PM »
Very nice. Love the richness in the B & W prints. Thanks for sharing!
2014 PCH 150 (Matte Black)
Nampa, ID

SymbaWal

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2014, 07:51:19 PM »
Here are the direct links to the books. Amazon has used copies for sale for under $3.00! Hope these links work:

http://www.amazon.com/Bikes-Burden-Hans-Kemp/dp/9628563734

http://www.amazon.com/Carrying-Cambodia-Hans-Kemp/dp/9628563785/
'10 SYM Symba (light blue)
'06 Tomos Revival
'01 Tomos Targa LX
'77 Garelli SuperSport XL
'72 Honda N600 (the car; 2 cyl. 598cc air-cooled)
(former bikes: '73 Honda CT90, '91 Honda CT70)

motox22a

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2014, 07:19:15 PM »
When I was in Africa it was the Yamaha Mate 50 which was the preferred beast of burden
used by all the Taxi Riders as well as for transportation of stuff that you would never believe...
I've seen two full size airconditioners stacked on top of one another on the passenger seat but
the most impressive was a full size sofa "balanced" on the passenger seat...The Taxi riders
definitely have some skills....
This was my Yamaha Mate 50 which I used there for 10 years everyday...What a great machine
50cc, 2 stroke, 3 speed auto clutch...I put 20,000 miles on it and never had to change the piston or rings (Just decarbon annually)...


---------------------------------------------------------------------
Not sure if this has been posted here before...

So, you're feeling good after you brought home a few groceries on your Symba, huh?

If you ever wanted to see how much stuff (or how many people) could potentially be (often, very hazardously) placed on a bike that is very similar to a Symba in size and power (most of these are Honda SuperCubs or derivations of that model), check out these books, "Bikes of Burden" and "Carrying Cambodia," by Hans Kemp. I bought both and am fascinated with what I have seen. I tried to put direct links to the images, but they don't seem to work, so here's the main site just click on "Bikes Of Burden Art Prints" for the images...

http://hanskemp.photoshelter.com/
[/quote]
« Last Edit: July 14, 2014, 07:49:41 PM by motox22a »

SymbaWal

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2014, 02:14:19 PM »
This was my Yamaha Mate 50 which I used there for 10 years everyday...What a great machine
50cc, 2 stroke, 3 speed auto clutch...I put 20,000 miles on it and never had to change the piston or rings (Just decarbon annually)...

What a cool bike. I take it that this was Yamaha's answer to the Honda Super Cub? Were there any differences between the two? Visually, it's almost impossible to distinguish the two.
'10 SYM Symba (light blue)
'06 Tomos Revival
'01 Tomos Targa LX
'77 Garelli SuperSport XL
'72 Honda N600 (the car; 2 cyl. 598cc air-cooled)
(former bikes: '73 Honda CT90, '91 Honda CT70)

HJracing

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2014, 04:16:56 PM »
In the sixties I had friends that had one of each and they would race. I think the Yam would usually win because it was a two stroke. They were just alike except for the sound that came out of them. Those were the days......  ride them all day and they never quit. And you have to remember those bikes had breaker-points.   
(2002 Triumph Bonneville America)  (1999 TM 300 MX )  (2012 Symba ) (Former bikes: 1969 Honda SL 90, 1985 Kaw.1000 LTD, 1976 Yam.DT 250)  Motorize bicycle

motox22a

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2014, 05:51:19 PM »
Yes...The original model was sold around 1965 and was Yamaha's answer to the Honda Supercub...The first version was a piston port 2-stroke engine....Then there was 1 or 2 years where the engine was a rotary valve 2 stroke engine (Like the old Kawasaki KE 100)...Eventually they became reed induction 2 strokes...Yamaha was the king of 2 stroke engines and even today they are the only Japanese manufacturer left making a 2 stroke Motocross bike (Although they haven't been significantly updated in about 10 years)....
The Yamaha Mate I believe only recently finally went out of production after about 45 years...The picture of mine is a year 2000 model which saw significant upgrades of the front brake, headlight, exhaust, etc. The bikes were (are) used in Japan for delivery of the mail and for delivering newspapers in fact there was a specific version just for that with a large carrier on the front. The delivery couriers in Japan also use them.
The bike was only meant for the Japanese market but it was so successful that it was imported new and used by many importers in many countries world wide. It was also available for sale to NGOs from Yamaha Japan direct for use in third world developing nations. In West Africa where I was they were imported used from Japan and used extensively by the Taxi Riders as well as the general populace. They were the most desired of all the imported cycles due to their incredible longevity (I saw running examples there over 30 years old)...In West Africa there was a huge new Chinese replacement parts supply for the Yamaha Mate which also made it very easy (and cheap) to maintain on an ongoing basis. I purchased my 2000 year model in 2001 when I arrived there and used it until the beginning of 2011 when I left. I gave it to my houseboy who had worked for me during the 10 years I was working there. I used it to go back and forth to work everyday (Twice a day actually as I went home for lunch)...Incredibly reliable and low maintenance. It would beat a Symba in a short race but the Symba would beat it in top speed as my Mate 50 was a 3 speed and topped out at about 40MPH. The Yamaha Mate actually came in various engine displacements over the years, 50cc, 60cc, 70cc, 80cc, and 90cc...It was a true holdover from the 60s and had leading link front suspension like the early 60s Japanese motorcycles all had. In fact to take the rear wheel off you disassembled each side of the axle like the 60s bikes as the axle did not go the whole way through the wheel...They were $1300 new in Japan in 2000...I paid that for my 2000 model in 2001 in West Africa...I was very lucky to get that new and pristine of a machine imported in West Africa...Many (most) are well used (and old) by the time they arrive there.

-------------------------------
What a cool bike. I take it that this was Yamaha's answer to the Honda Super Cub? Were there any differences between the two? Visually, it's almost impossible to distinguish the two.
[/quote]
« Last Edit: July 31, 2014, 12:09:16 PM by motox22a »

DrZook

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2014, 07:51:22 PM »
I showed my wife some of those pics in Cambodia. She still won't let me take her and our two kids out for a jaunt in the country for some reason. :o
BTW, beautiful Mate. I just found a 1972 U7E (predecessor to the V-series Mate) on Craigslist for $300. Needs a lot of work and TLC.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2014, 08:04:24 PM by DrZook »
2010 Symba
1981 Twinstar

motox22a

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Re: Bikes of Burden and Carrying Cambodia
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2014, 10:28:20 PM »
If I were in Michigan I'd think about getting it...The 70cc version definitely is able to pull
a higher top speed...I love that kind of burnt orange metallic color that they used on bikes from that era...
Honda used it on some of their CBs and on the CT70 as well as I remember...


BTW, beautiful Mate. I just found a 1972 U7E (predecessor to the V-series Mate) on Craigslist for $300. Needs a lot of work and TLC.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2014, 12:33:05 PM by motox22a »

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