Author Topic: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build  (Read 16796 times)

Dingleberry Immenhoffer

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2019, 03:16:26 PM »
I removed the choke pull from the motorcycle (I don't need it anymore as the new flat-slide carb will not be using a choke cable).  In its place I installed the new tire pressure monitoring system gauge.  It fits in there nicely.



Mounted up.



Detail shot of mounting hardware.

DeepSeaWolf

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2019, 06:52:00 PM »
I removed gages and left the choke plus installed indicator lights.


Dingleberry Immenhoffer

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2019, 08:03:00 AM »
No gauges!  I looooooooooove my tachometer, I don't think I could do without it. 
I bet your front end looks clean though.

doombug

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2019, 02:21:17 PM »
It's honestly not that bad having no gauges. It feels like the difference between a manual and automatic, you're more in tune with the bike. That being said I'm glad I fixed the wiring issue with my gauge swap, I like having a functional headlight haha

Dingleberry Immenhoffer

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #19 on: September 19, 2019, 03:33:16 PM »
OK.  So I finished up with a pile of changes I wanted to make on the motorcycle.  I'm calling these changes

PHASE 1
Front End:
-The stock headlight mounts were removed and discarded. 
-Aftermarket headlight brackets were installed.
-Mini LED turn signals were installed on the headlight brackets.
-An electrical tape cross was added to the headlight.
-The choke pull and cable were removed from the motorcycle.  The choke is now handled by hand with the lever on the carburetor body.
-The ignition switch plate was modified to accept a TPMS gauge and the switch plate was lowered.
-The gauge cluster mounting bracket was lowered to the underside of its stock mount point.
-The clip on handelbar controls were moved closer to the motorcycle and the bars were shortened by .8 inches.
-The handlebars were installed below the top triple clamp.
-Bar end mirrors were installed.

Engine:
-The new fuel petcock was installed.  I like it so far but it was a pain to get the fuel hoses to fit on the outlet nipple of the petcock.
-Clear fuel hose was added between the fuel filter and the carburetor (When troubleshooting small engines, I like to be able to visually verify that the carburetor is receiving fuel).
-The exhaust pipe was wrapped in fiberglass.
-The drive sprocket was switched to a 17 tooth from PBI.
-The bike was desmogged.  I lowered the needle 1 position and it fires right up with the kickstarter.

Electrical:
-The stock battery was removed and an AntiGravity battery was installed in its place.
-Battery maintainer power cables were installed on the battery terminals.
-The stock blinker control was removed and replaced with an LED control.
-The beautiful new red spark plug wire wouldn't work on the Wolf.  The ignition coil's exit lead is cast with the rest of the coil and it cannot be modified.  :'(
-After switching the turn signals to LEDs, a set of diodes were required.  The turn signal bleeds from R to L (And vice versa) at the turn signal gauge light on the instrument cluster.  Read about the diode issue and install here:
https://www.customled.com/blogs/custom-led-product-information/4-way-hazard-blink-problem-on-motorcycles-with-led-turn-signals

Rear End:
-The rear fender was bobbed.
-The stock taillights, turn signals, and license plate holder were discarded.
-The taillight and license plate holder was replaced.
-The turn signals are now mounted to the license plate.
-The rear brake light is accentuated by two more red LEDs mounted to the license plate.

All in all, I am very pleased with the results.



PHASE 1 PHOTO GALLERY































« Last Edit: October 02, 2019, 12:06:05 AM by Dingleberry Immenhoffer »

DeepSeaWolf

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2019, 09:20:46 PM »
No gauges!  I looooooooooove my tachometer, I don't think I could do without it. 
I bet your front end looks clean though.

Not too bad. Looks more clean and like they said, your more one with your wolf

doombug

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2019, 09:38:20 PM »
I was thinking about cuting the clip ons and mounting below the triple tree. So I gotta ask what are your afterthoughts, handling and ride position specifically?

Dingleberry Immenhoffer

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2019, 10:15:06 PM »
SeaWolf:  Yeah I would like to minimize the gauges as much as possible, but one thing I like about them is how large they are for ease of reading.  Since this is a starter bike for my niece and nephew, I want them to be able to pick up speed and tach information at a quick glance.  So I'll be keeping the large stock gauges... maybe when the kids are grown up I will strip the gauges and go for a minimalist setup.

Doombug:  Dude definitely take the time and energy and lower the clip ons.  I'm a large, heavy man, and in order to go faster than 65mph on the flat I have to ride tucked to reduce wind drag.  The new, lowered clip on position makes for more comfortable riding while tucked.  And, BONUS, the gauges in their lower position are easier to read when I am tucked as compared to their stock position.  Plus the bike just looks more racy.  It took me a day's labor to get the Phase 1 front end work done.
 
The stock clip ons do not have any drop, however.  They will need some more drop as my wrists are a bit sore from a couple hundred tucked miles. 

To add some drop, I've got some Italian clip ons from Treatland.com in hand:

https://www.treatland.tv/malossi-MVR-clip-on-handlebars-32mm-p/malossi-mvr-clipons-697787.htm
But these solid aluminum bars need machining in order to be trimmed to length and bored out to accept the bar end mirrors.  So the drop clip-ons will be in the queue for Phase 2 modifications.




And I was thinking that I may pick up these fully adjustable clip ons so that I can adjust the control position depending on what type of riding I am doing on the bike... we'll see:

https://www.treatland.tv/fully-adjustable-domino-32mm-clip-on-bars-p/domino-clip-on-bars-32mm.htm

ChairmanMaose

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2019, 11:30:41 PM »
Finally some pictures. Looking good. Since you moved the clip-ons below the triple-tree and are willing to get yourself into that cafe position, you should drop the entirety of the front a bit. Give the bike a flat traditional cafe profile. Allow me to live vicariously through you.

IB

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2019, 01:39:55 PM »
I can't see through the bike! That battery is in the way. You should relocate it under the seat with a sealed battery, remove the air box, an put a pod filter. Looks so much better. ;)
2017 Sym Wolf Classic

1986 Honda VF500F  Street fighter!

doombug

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2019, 02:24:14 PM »
Sweet. I was also looking at a similar pair, https://www.ebay.ca/itm/7-8-22mm-Adjustable-Clip-On-Ons-Handlebar-Universal-For-50mm-Fork-Motocycle-Hot-/303224753968?nav=SEARCH

Great work on the bike, looks amazing👍

Dingleberry Immenhoffer

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #26 on: September 21, 2019, 03:23:41 AM »
Thanks for the feedback. 

I agree with you Maose that the front end must come down, and I agree with you IB that the air filter box and battery must go so that the frame is exposed.  The bike needs suspension upgrades as well, and the seat needs to be replaced with a fabricated one.  A new rear swingarm needs to be manufactured.  The exhaust must be cut and mated to the new muffler.  The stock carb needs to be removed and replaced with the TM24 flat slide carb.  All of the electronics that are currently under the side covers must be stashed elsewhere.  The list goes on.

But I've been building this bike in my brother's garage on my vacation, far away from home.  And I have to go back to work in a few days, and I'm not sure when I will be returning next.

I chose the Phase 1 modification list with the following guiding principles:
-The bike shall be built with the intention of bringing more fun into the world.
-The bike shall be built in a cafe racer style.
-The modifications I make shall be permanent and reliable so that my niece and nephew do not have to do a lot of extra maintenance in order to keep my mods. functioning properly.
-The bike shall be built such that in the event of the bike going down on its side (Either in the parking lot or on the road) the only items that will break off the machine are the handlebar control levers and the bar-end mirrors (Spare parts are already on hand). 

Life is full of compromises, and on account of my limited time to work on the motorcycle before returning to work, I was only able to do so much to change the look and performance of the machine.  Man alive I REALLY wanted to cut the exhaust off and stick that race carb on... but I would have run out of time to get the bike into a healthy and powerful state of tune before I left, and my dear relatives would end up owning a pretty, if non-functional motorcycle. 

So the parts for Phase II modifications are in the garage here and I have no doubt that they will serve as a beacon unto me, shining brightly in order to guide me back to this place someday so that I can finish the cafe racer conversion for my niece and nephew's Wolf...

But holy cow what a sexy f--k--g bike for these kids to learn how to ride on.  I've gifted them the machine I always wanted at their age.  Interestingly enough, in doing so I gifted myself the same thing.  :)

Mr. OX

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2019, 02:08:05 PM »
Looks like a fun build! I was Disappointed in the way the spark plug wire was made as a part of the coil too. I had a nice cloth wire I wanted to use.
Also- If you donít need your headlight ears, I could use them, and a front fender.
PM me if you want a new home for your discards and we can see what we can work out.
2012 Sym Wolf, 1974 MZ TS250, early 1950s Soviet M72, 1967 Triumph Bonneville, 1971 BMW R75/5, 1978 BMW R100s.

Dingleberry Immenhoffer

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2019, 01:05:19 PM »
I needed to finish a bit of electrical before my vacation ended and I had to fly home.  I installed diodes at the turn signal indicator lamp in the instrument cluster, and grounded out the bulb.  I also wired in the power to the TPMS gauge.

Since I needed to disassemble the front end to get at the wiring, I figured I may as well Murder Out the front end a bit to lessen the shine from all of that chrome.  A $6 rattle can of matte black did the job nicely.

Because I took the front end apart for wiring and paint, I figured I may as well lower the headlight, the gauges, the ignition plate, and the bars another few inches.  I used some long metric bolts from the hardware store to mount the gauge bracket and ignition switch plate well below the underside of the top triple clamp.  I repurposed some rubber bushings from then tail light as vibration dampeners for the gauge bracket on my new longass underside mounting bolts.

There probably won't be any further updates on the thread until Winter, when I can get back to my brother's house for the Phase 2 work.

See ya'll around the forum in the meantime.






I modified the switch plate with a portable bandsaw and an angle grinder to sit below the triple clamp.




Nicked my finger pretty good while cutting the plate on the bandsaw.  Be careful out there, boys and girls!  :o



The seat actually works OK with the new lines now that the front end has been lowered more.  However, a new seat is still planned in the future.



The new lineup... Yamaha R6, Sym Wolf, child's bicycle.  Note the "exhaust" I installed off the back of the seat on my nephews's pedal bike.

doombug

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Re: 2017 Wolf Cafe Build
« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2019, 05:38:49 PM »
Looks great, not your finger though, that looks bad. Good to see that the ignition switch bracket can be mounted on the underside. I wanted to do it as well but was worried about the tree's threading.

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