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Symba / Re: Symba Carburetor Jets and Air Fuel Screw Information
« Last post by vintagegarage on July 02, 2020, 07:21:18 PM »
Sorry to reactivate this old topic, but I found it with search, and so others might find it too in the future.  I seem to be the only one buying and restoring Symbas but here is some additional information that may help someone with questions about the Symba carb, vs. the Kawasaki ATV carb.

First, I confirmed that motox22a is correct.  The Kawasaki air bleed screw has different threads than the one on the Symba.  See this photo I took today.  The Symba is on the right, and the Kawasaki is on the left:


I also bought a complete Kawasaki carb and the air bleed screw in it is the same as the 75-23013-Y001 screw, so the number for the screw itself is not an error.    The main jet in the Kawasaki carb is an 85 and the slow jet is a 40, if my vision is correct.  Also, the connector for the wires to the bystarter is different than that on the Symba.  The Kawasaki carb may be a good replacement for the Symba carb, once the Symba carb becomes unavailable, if all you do is change the main jet to a 58, and splice the wires to the bystarter connector.  I have not tried that.  The Symba carb is still available for $290 plus shipping from Scooter Dynasty, and the Kawasaki is $175 plus shipping from Partzilla.

The Symba I have been working on had been sitting in a shed in Florida out of the rain, but nonetheless in the Florida humidity for 10 years.  The previous owner had "cleaned the carb" to get it running for sale.  It sort of ran, but idled on the main jet, and it had a stumble when accelerating after each gear shift.  The main jet said 58 on it, and the spark plug was sooty black.  I decided that it was running rich at speed, and ordered a new 58 main jet and also a 55. I never got to try the 55 main jet as the stumble went away when I installed the new 58 main jet.  I assume that the main jet had been reamed out with a welding tip cleaner sometime in it's past.   

I had to remove the glued in air bleed screw in order to properly clean the idle circuit passageways.  The end of it was already bunged up, so I ended up cutting a slot in it with a Dremel tool and after a lot of work, was able to get the air bleed screw out, and once out, I was able to cut a proper deep slot in it.  After blowing out the idle circuit passageways, and reinstalling the air bleed screw, idle was now perfect, and idle mixture was easily adjustable. 

By the way, the air bleed screw on the Scooter Dynasty replacement Symba carb comes with a slotted air bleed screw instead of the D-head screw in my original Symba carb, and the Kawasaki carb comes with a D-head screw.  That D-head is identical to the air bleed screw on the early Honda Metropolitan scooters and Honda Ruckus scooters.  The Honda tool to turn the D-head screw is available from your Honda Powersports dealer if you ask for it.  I never got the part number for it, but here is a photo of the tool.  It has a flexible end on it so you can get to the D-head screw from any angle:



Bottom line is that I managed to get the original Symba carb working perfectly, and now the engine idles well, and runs well with no stumble.  I'll put the Kawasaki carb on the parts shelf and use it if I come across a Symba with a missing carb. 

I am still buying Symbas in the southeast USA with clear titles.


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Wolf Classic 150 / Re: Cabin Racer Project
« Last post by doombug on July 02, 2020, 03:23:28 PM »
The Wolf was my first bike and because of the battery Iíve only been kickstarting it. So I have nothing to base its efficiency off of but it usually turns over first kick unless its cold. It definitely became more effective once the smog stuff got removed and adjusted the valves and carb.

One other factor may be that I only run ethanol free premium. Though I canít say it made much of a difference. Maybe the gas combined with storing it in an attached garage helps prevent enough moisture to ease the bike turning over.

Higher mileage might help, I hear it takes a few thought miles for these bikes to settle in. Iím at about 15k miles on mine.
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Wolf Classic 150 / Re: Cabin Racer Project
« Last post by GrumpyUnk on July 02, 2020, 02:13:45 PM »
How well does the kick start do?  I find that I can kick it over no problem, but it does not start like my old CB350, which I could adjust as I desired.  With nothing to adjust but the idle speed, how do you get it to be cooperative?  When I use the electric starter, I have to diddle with the throttle, choke on, to get it to start, and it really doesn't fire off like the old Honda did, nor some China scooters I have done work on.  Both have adjustable mixture & speed.
 Any hints on getting the kick to work better?  Maybe when I get over the 500 mile mark it will improve, or it may take more miles than that.
tom
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Wolf Classic 150 / Re: Throttle Slide Damage from Idle Screw?
« Last post by GrumpyUnk on July 02, 2020, 02:08:22 PM »
 Those should not hurt anything.  The idle hard stop screw that is designed to keep the slide open a bit was tightened into the side.  The screw did not(will likely not) move the slide up without a slight assist.  It is on a taper, but apparently the screw dug in rather than moving the slide up to increase idle rpm.
 Clean them up, and set your hot idle, but be sure to open the slide before screwing in too hard.  Nothing happens there, but you do want to make sure the rough surface does not cling to the stop screw tip when you open the slide.  If so, clean it up with emery or cloth backed fine abrasive and make sure to remove any filings.
tom
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General Discussion / Re: Mirrors
« Last post by Tromper on July 01, 2020, 11:10:52 PM »
Maybe something along these lines?
https://www.amazon.com/Mirrors-Extender-Riser-Adapter-Scooter/dp/B007S048FI
https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-Pair-Mirror-Extender-Adapter-With-8MM-Bolt-Universal-Fits-Scooters-Sportbikes-/264468776991

Or if you get a slipstreamer windscreen it comes with the  option to raise the mirrors a bit.
https://www.partsforscooters.com/172-83_Scoot_66_Windshield for instance. (check the hardware pic)

There are also alternative mirrors and such in a variety of arm lengths and shapes.

Cheers
Tromper
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General Discussion / Re: 1st oil change/2020 Fiddle III 200i
« Last post by Tromper on July 01, 2020, 10:55:48 PM »
Like Syd says...
Go fast is great.
Stop good is vital.

That said
Read somewhere that they got about 65mph when broken in I think that'd be about as fast as I'd want to take a small wheeled chassis.
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General Discussion / Re: 1st oil change/2020 Fiddle III 200i
« Last post by Syd on July 01, 2020, 06:35:52 PM »
Scoots rarely are the listed displacement, but good brakes are as unusual as they are great.
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General Discussion / 1st oil change/2020 Fiddle III 200i
« Last post by Sandles on July 01, 2020, 06:21:20 PM »
Changed the fluids at 200 miles. No issues, no problems. That was easy.
Best thing about the bike? The brakes.
Worst thing about the bike? It's not a 200.
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General Discussion / Re: Mirrors
« Last post by Sandles on July 01, 2020, 06:12:39 PM »
Thanks for the views and ideas. I've adjusted them a few times, a little better but too busy riding to shop.
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General Discussion / Re: Mirrors
« Last post by m. chops on July 01, 2020, 04:03:05 PM »
Interesting.  I found this forum because I just got a SYM Fiddle III 200 that I so far love.  My only issue is with the mirrors. (Sound familiar, Sandles?)  I'm not staring at my elbows, but I am at my shoulders.

When I picked up the bike, I was staring at my elbows.  The dealer rolled out the mirrors such that they moved further to the outside by a couple of inches.  After that adjustment, my elbows were gone. Maybe that will help you.

But I'm still looking for something taller.
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