Author Topic: Poor front brake performance?  (Read 6985 times)

campurvis

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 423
  • www.scooterseals.com
    • View Profile
    • www.scooterseals.com
Re: Poor front brake performance?
« Reply #45 on: May 21, 2017, 08:16:11 AM »
It doesn't matter what kind of bike you have, the ratio between piston area in the brake lever master cylinder and piston area in the brake caliper cylinder, or cylinders (down by the wheel) is absolutely CRITICAL. Factory brakes have this all sorted out.
A mismatch, between lever area piston size  and wheel area piston/s size will either give you very weak brakes, or brakes that seem okay but can  unexpectedly lock up in an instant with little or no notice.  Both situations can be extremely dangerous.  Read up on brake science before you buy anything because there are several different master cylinder piston sizes available--same for down below--and advertisers seldom state this vital technical information.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 08:27:45 AM by campurvis »
Hsinchu City, Taiwan

scosgt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1290
    • View Profile
Re: Poor front brake performance?
« Reply #46 on: May 21, 2017, 03:32:35 PM »
I have been using the sintered Pads on the HD for two years. They work much much better.
They do eat the rotor, but I obtained three new spare rotors.
Would rather replace the rotor every 8K or 10K miles, then crash on a bike that failed to stop in time.

jesse in cbus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Poor front brake performance?
« Reply #47 on: May 21, 2017, 04:09:06 PM »
It doesn't matter what kind of bike you have, the ratio between piston area in the brake lever master cylinder and piston area in the brake caliper cylinder, or cylinders (down by the wheel) is absolutely CRITICAL. Factory brakes have this all sorted out.
A mismatch, between lever area piston size  and wheel area piston/s size will either give you very weak brakes, or brakes that seem okay but can  unexpectedly lock up in an instant with little or no notice.  Both situations can be extremely dangerous.  Read up on brake science before you buy anything because there are several different master cylinder piston sizes available--same for down below--and advertisers seldom state this vital technical information.
thank you for topics to research.
i would imagine a larger rotor might need a larger master cylinder.
i don't have any idea where to look up stock part specifics, ie - the diameter of the brake caliper piston on people s200, or the master cylinder of the hd200, or the mounting points of the discs to see if they would even mount to the wheel. which may make my whole point moot if they don't match up.
in the mean time, i'll just use sinstered pads and figure rotors into operating costs.