Author Topic: smog device removal  (Read 17943 times)

Symba_X

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2012, 05:34:24 PM »
Thank you millions Gitsum! I tried to plugged the tubes with some paper and it seemed to idle longer. However I could still hear the air leaking. Im going to get some silicon now, and hope it will seal better.

pacnwfoto

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2012, 05:41:19 PM »
.... Im going to get some silicon now, and hope it will seal better.

Plug them with a small bolt, a piece of round pencil or wood dowel, etc.  That way the plug is reversible, and there is no chance of a wad of silicone goop getting sucked into the system.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 05:53:54 PM by pacnwfoto »
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gitsum

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2012, 06:12:54 PM »
Just use a screwdriver to thread in a tight fitting bolt or screw ;)

Symba_X

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Smog Device Removal
« Reply #18 on: May 16, 2012, 07:03:10 PM »
Alright! With the help from Gitsum and Pacnwfoto the smog junk are out!
These are some pictures for who wants to do it.

First: Removing the gas tank

Bracket need to be pulled out of this rubber thing first.


Unhooked all the tubes connected to the petcock.
Disconnect this.


Pull the gas tank up and back to get it out.
This is the gas vent tube, and it needs to be unhooked too.


Second: Remove all the junks

These is all the stuff under the gas tank that you will need to remove.  
Leave the blue arrow tube alone and it needs to be plugged.


Third: Reroute tubes and seal the hole

I used a long tube from the junk to reroute gas vent to the front of the engine.
Then this tube going back to the front of the rear wheel.


I use a piece of aluminum, high temp gasket, and 2 big washers to seal the holes from the right of the engine.

This tube needs to be plugged too.



Thats it :D

« Last Edit: June 06, 2012, 08:15:12 PM by Symba_X »

chiquito

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2012, 08:26:56 AM »
Thanks to everyone that contributed to this thread!  I removed all of the smog junk this weekend and I'm so happy with it.  I don't notice a change in performance/smoothness while riding, but the very welcome difference is during startup and idle.  Starting is much easier - no throttle required, and idle is smoother - I was able to reduce my idle speed by 300-400rpm which is great.  I hacked together a metal cover where the black air pipe was, but a friend of mine has a CNC machine so he's making me a much nicer one; I'll post when it's done.   Meanwhile, good riddance to this mess:

gitsum

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2012, 09:31:15 AM »
Good job!

chiquito

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2012, 07:46:22 PM »
The issue I had is fixed, but I'll leave it below because I think I found a bug/issue/quirk that may help others in the future
I looked again at the whole works and while everything around smog removal was indeed fine, I noticed the fuel filter was basically empty!  That explains the hot engine and intermittent starting.  I blame the long idle time I had - could it be that at idle, there is not enough vacuum to draw sufficient fuel into the filter/carb?  I manually re-filled the filter with fuel and took it for a spin just now and it's back to normal, so it was definitely a lack of fuel.  The question still is why - again, probably long idle, but is it only long idles with the smog stuff removed or just long idles in general?

TL;DR A 10-15 minute idle may result in a net loss in fuel in the fuel filter and carb
_____________________________________________________________________________
Hi - me again with trouble  ???  >:(

As I posted just a couple days ago, I removed all of the junk and right off the bat it was excellent - starting w/o throttle, idling much better, etc... and then this afternoon that all stopped.  I probably have 75-100 miles on it since I removed the junk this last weekend with 50 of those on sunday alone, so I feel like that work was fine and dandy.  

Today I commuted to work (5 miles), then home for lunch and back again (so 15 total now), and all was GREAT, but then coming home from work was a mess.  Rain was just moving out of the area - wet roads and just a few drops falling yet so I started the bike and waited for 5-10 minutes in the garage waiting for the rain to clear out fully.  Idle was great during the wait, and then I pulled out, got into second, got past 5k rpm or so, and it lurched forward as if I was braking.  I gave it some more gas and it died and I pulled over.  Key off, wait a few seconds, use the starter (PLENTY of battery, don't suspect that at all), and it starts just fine, but sputters when giving it gas.  I figure out that if I give it a LOT of gas (like over 6k rpm), I can keep it lit, and so I drive it like that all the way home - trying to keep it around 7k rpm in all gears.  I stopped a few times given some lights and stuff and it took 35 minutes to do the 5 miles.  During one of the restarts it really didn't want to go and I reverted to kicking it to save the starter from the heat.  But eventually it did again and I got it home with a pretty warm/hot engine.

So I remove seat and tank and I'm sure I'm going to see my plug of the large-diameter hose under the tank from the airbox/carb junction has fallen out, but it was perfectly sealed and still is.  I used a large short bolt and even used some glue when I threaded it in there.  I can't rotate the bolt so everything held and it is sealed.  

Ok, so then I check the other stuff I had to re-run....new longer gas tank vent line is not pinched anywhere and is routed away from the exhaust....new vacuum line from petcock to intake manifold is just fine.  the other little hose with the white tape from the intake manifold is still securely plugged with a tight-fitting bolt, and the carb vent line is not kinked either and was left unplugged originally and still is.  The carb vent line was routed via the same path the clear battery vent line takes and is about an inch shorter than that as well.  

In other words, everything looks IDENTICAL to when I removed the smog device stuff and sealed/re-routed lines 75-100 miles ago!  What gives?!

Thanks much if you've read this far; sorry for the wall of text.  cheers!

EDIT: this was the first time this bike has touched any form of rain/moisture, so I can't help but want to blame that, but that seems silly since it was nothing more than a drop or two and wet roads...

EDIT2:  I'm just trying to think what else was different about this evening, and it was easily the longest I've let it idle before setting off.  Like 5x more....relevant?
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« Last Edit: June 06, 2012, 09:30:43 PM by chiquito »

pacnwfoto

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2012, 10:16:42 PM »
What the smog stuff you removed does is trap gasoline evaporation from the tank and carburetor float bowl, crankcase vaporized oil and combustion blow-by, and it injects a hit of air into the exhaust to keep it hot longer to more completely burn hydrocarbons.  

> .... got past 5k rpm or so, and it lurched forward as if I was braking.  I gave it some more gas
> and it died....it starts just fine, but sputters when giving it gas.... I give it a LOT of gas (like over
> 6k rpm), I can keep it lit...During one of the restarts it really didn't want to go...

The carburetor has two jetting circuits: a primary [aka pilot] jet for low rpm, and the main jet for higher revs.  If it "got past 5K and it lurched", that points to immediate fuel starvation through the main and combustion suddenly got weak or stopped.  But, if it runs with a "LOT of gas (like over 6k rpm], I can keep it lit", then it is getting some fuel when the slide needle it lifted higher.  There could be a particle of junk drifting around in the carburetor's float bowl which has risen up to partially block the man jet.  


> ....I noticed the fuel filter was basically empty!

That changes things.  Possibly, the tank is not adequately vented.  As gas flows via gravity to the carburetor the volume in the tank is reduced.  With no vent or a restricted vent, the falling fuel can create a vacuum in the tank which will eventually stop flow to the carb.  Next time you have the problem, open and close the tank's cap and see if the engine returns to normal.  The particle in the float bowl is still a possible, though.

And, be sure the vacuum hose leading to the tank petcock is not perforated, and is sealed against the nipple fittings at both ends.

My 2 cents, for now.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2012, 10:34:24 PM by pacnwfoto »
Just say NO to ugly and impractical motorcycles.

mobyjohnson

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2014, 09:06:44 AM »
Hey, looking to do the Smog removal in the next few weeks here. Have decent moto wrenching skills but not too many McGyver skills.

1) What have you guys been using to 'plug' some of these tubes? Someone dropped the notion of silicon, is that just a squeeze it from a tube and let it sit operations? Would hot glue work?

2) Any advice on cutting/making that custom bracket to on the side of the engine? Just scratch steel/aluminum and drill some holes?

3) Will my average hardware store down the street have a 'high-temp' gasket sheet that I can cut for that shape?

4) Will this make my Wolf EVEN MORE irresistible? :)

Thanks!

CapnK

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2014, 01:48:09 PM »
It is an easy process, Moby - have no fear.

I used screw(s) for the tube plugging, and made the little cover for the side of the engine from a piece of cheap aluminum bar stock, and mounted that with a little RTV sealant to serve as a gasket. Has worked fine for over 1K miles.

IMO & experience, it will make your Wolf run better and start more reliably.
Lovin' my Wolf & Riding in G-town, SC.

Mr_Krabs

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2014, 11:48:33 PM »
For my cover for the hole in the side of the engine case I simply cut the metal tube off the original flange with a dremel. This left a plate with a hole in it. I simply cut a sheet of aluminum can to act as a gasket which goes between the flange with the hole and the block and seals the hole right up. Easy as pie. No big ugly washers and you use some of the original hardware you were going to throw anyways.

CapnK

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2014, 09:49:47 AM »
Here's a pic of what mine wound up looking like:

Lovin' my Wolf & Riding in G-town, SC.

yahodahan

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2014, 01:39:14 AM »
Necro? Seems best to keep the info here, rather than start new.

I intend to do this over the week, however would like to know- any knowledge/changes since having done this relatively long ago? Just curious.

Also, as I don't have access to a method of fabricating that block-plate, is there another method you could recommend? Thanks, and again, sorry for the "necro"! :P

EDIT: oops now I see alt methods posted right above :)
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 12:53:48 PM by yahodahan »

yahodahan

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #28 on: September 17, 2014, 05:57:04 PM »
Another note: I just finished this, thank you VERY Much gitsum, symba_x, and others! I was barely able to start the bike before, now it starts right up with zero throttle!! Happy, I am :)

Seems I'll be purchasing a second Wolf in the near-ish future, I'll endeavor to do a full video of this procedure for people like me who benefit from all the details...

Thanks again!

CElias

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Re: smog device removal
« Reply #29 on: September 26, 2014, 07:22:07 AM »
What the smog stuff you removed does is trap gasoline evaporation from the tank and carburetor float bowl, crankcase vaporized oil and combustion blow-by, and it injects a hit of air into the exhaust to keep it hot longer to more completely burn hydrocarbons. 

Would you please educate me on this issue?  In general I do not try to update/change designs because I assume that some engineer somewhere spent time designing and came up with optimal solutions.  In this case, it seems that this mod is simple and without consequences--the bike does look better without the "smog stuff" but also it is reported as improving startup and also lower revs at idle. 

The question is, therefore, what is the trade-off related to removing the "smog stuff"?

Cheers and thanks,

CElias