Author Topic: Topping-up SYMBA's tires?  (Read 110 times)

LisaRae

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 151
    • View Profile
Topping-up SYMBA's tires?
« on: August 21, 2017, 10:02:33 AM »
Hi all,

I've owned my SYMBA for 7 years (the anniversary of getting/riding is still a couple of weeks away, as a vacation intervened), and we're just over 18,000+ km.

I find I need to top-up SYMBA's tires weekly, as they lose about 5 psi/week. I keep the front at 25 psi, and the rear at 35 psi.

I am petite, but not lightweight, and a carry a goodly amount of stuff in a back basket...

How often do you find you need to top-up your tires?

LisaRae
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 03:28:03 PM by LisaRae »

Retro Moto

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
    • View Profile
Re: Topping-up SYMBA's tires?
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2017, 06:43:08 PM »
Lisa,

Not often at all! In fact, been at least 5 weeks since my last top off. Could it be the weight you're carrying in the back seat?
2015 Symba

campurvis

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 429
  • www.scooterseals.com
    • View Profile
    • www.scooterseals.com
Re: Topping-up SYMBA's tires?
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2017, 01:17:56 AM »
Obviously you’ve got a very tiny leak.  Could be a speck of dust on the seat of your tube’s valve core. Take it out with a valve core tool and clean it.  If you don’t have a valve core tool, many older motorcycles and bicycles used to come with a screw-on metal valve cap that was also such a tool.
If that doesn’t cure it, get a new valve core at a bicycle shop.  After that, the next suspect is a minute pin hole in the tube for whatever reason. Replace or patch the tube.

OR your tire has moved in relation to the rim and pulled your tube with it, but your tube’s valve stem is secured in place by the nut that secures it to the rim.  Thus the tube stretches there as the tube moves and trouble follows—meaning a new tube sooner or later—you can’t patch that one.

Regardless --throw that nut in the garbage where it belongs.  Then eyeball the valve every few weeks. If it is no longer at 90 degrees to the rim, put the bike on its centre stand, let the air out, lock up the brake and get a pal to give a mighty yank on  the tire to get everything back to a position on the rim where the valve stem sticks out perpendicular to the rim.  Add air and you're rolling again.

« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 03:42:32 AM by campurvis »
Hsinchu City, Taiwan