Author Topic: LED Replacement Headlight  (Read 5467 times)

Franko

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2016, 07:20:51 PM »
I just installed and H4 LED headlight replacement from superbrightleds.com. This does not have a fan, its passively cooled with some copper braid. I tried this one because it came from what appears to be a real company with actual engineering (heat management is the challenge for LEDs). This is 1.4 amps, about 17 W in place of the OEM 55 W halogen high beam. The low beam is already way brighter than the old high beam, and the high beam much better, traffic signs and lane refectors "pop out" almost twice as far away.

I almost always ride with the high beams on since they did not appear to bother anyone. After the swap someone flashed their brights at me for the first time  :)

The heat sink braid fits just below radiator and fan the near vents, so cooling should be good.



The three-tab "spider" adapter for the bulb must be put correctly on the LED fixture to fit the H4, there are two ways. The little 'shelf' under the front pair of LEDs (low beam)  should be UNDER the LEDs so the low beam reflects down (not in instructions). There is a small module, about the size of a 9V battery, that plugs into the old H4 cable on one end and the bulb unit on the other. This fit my HD 200 headlight fitting without mods. I just pulled the braid through the rubber boot.

About $40 and well worth it!
15 SYM HD 200

scosgt

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2016, 07:17:26 AM »
Again, I have tried this one and the one I posted above from Cyclops is way, way way better.

hsympson

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2016, 11:54:25 AM »
I'm pretty sure I wouldn't want anything brighter than the one I got.  I am going to carry the stock halogen bulb with me in case there is an unexpected failure of the LED headlight.

Northpilot, did you do anything to seal the back of the headlight assembly, or were you able to use the stock rubber boot in some way?  I suppose I could split the boot to get it on but I would like to avoid that.

LED related - I replaced the dummy turn signal bulbs in the rear with amber LED ones, I left the regular stalk turn signals on also.  Again, almost too bright but there will be no mistaking when I have my turn signals on, they work perfectly. I'm leaving the incandescent rear running/brake bulb alone since I am installing a light bar on the back of the rack which has three (middle and each end of bar) running lights and eight LEDs that will be modulated for brake light.  I don't think it is overkill, when I am driving behind a motorcycle it strikes me that the standard lights don't attract enough attention in low light situations.

scosgt

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2016, 03:51:54 PM »
When I tried the type of LED you speak of, the problem was that it has distinct LEDs for high or low beam. One goes on, one goes off. That makes you highly dependent on your reflector design.
With the Cyclops unit, all LEDs stay on in high beam mode. It gives one hell of a high beam, which is what you want.

Northpilot

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2016, 08:22:33 PM »
The similar LED bulb replacements that HSympson and I have installed have two 'always-on' low-beam elements on their top two sides, and a third LED element on the bottom which also comes on when the high-beam is selected.  This light is very bright and appears to be well made.  The integral inverter in the back is cooled by a fan, which seems to be of brushless design, similar to computer fans, which typically last thousands of hours.

Another bulb in this thread has a copper braided heat sink to dissipate heat (see Franko post), which may be the best solution of all -- no moving parts  -- if it actually is capable of dissipating the heat and preventing early failure.

These bulbs that Hsympson and I bought (see picture reply #7) cost a little less than $20.00, delivered.  One bulb reported in this thread cost several times as much and failed right out of the box -- thank you for reporting, Scosgt.

Hsympson, to answer your question, I also found no way to fit the stock rubber boot over the back of the new, bulkier, bulb.  These bulbs look well sealed, but I guess we'll find out next time we're caught out in a deluge! :)  I did coat the spade terminals on the three-prong plug with that red anti-corrosion syrup they sell for battery terminals, and sealed the plugs with tape.

So Mateys, if we all keep reporting success or failure, cost of bulb, cost of shipping, availability and ordering info, we may be able to zero in on the best solution to one of the most important safety elements of our HD200's.  So far my own experience has been dismal: two failed after-market HID bulbs, and finally this LED bulb, which is great so far, but still fairly new, so the jury is still out...
« Last Edit: March 12, 2016, 08:26:49 PM by Northpilot »
2009 SYM HD200

scosgt

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #20 on: March 12, 2016, 09:48:03 PM »
I use the HID on my HD, and never ever had any problem with it. You start the bike in "high", let it run a minute or two to build up a charge in the capacitor, and switch to the low beam. It is not sealed, and has been on board since 2010 without any issues.

I had tried the HID on the BV 250. The headlight casing did not fit the bulb properly, had to mod it. Then it just drew too much current, messed with the computer. So I had to go with the LED, and the one I posted is super. The first one did fail, they sent me a replacement immediately.

Note that I have installed HIDs on my car, basically the same system, but on the car you need to use a relay harness and wire directly to the battery, because IT MESSES WITH THE COMPUTER if you plug it in direct. The LED in the BV has no computer issues.
The other thing was that the reflector in the BV sucks. The length of the bulb makes a huge difference, some are shorter and some are longer. It did not like the longer one at all. And it would not keep both filaments lit at the same time. So the LED was the solution, along with shock mounted driving lights. NOW I can see at night.

But the HID on the HD is still better.

Northpilot

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #21 on: March 14, 2016, 12:02:21 AM »
At Scosgt: So, the bulb you are using in your SYM HD200 is a combination halogen high beam/HID low beam?  You start up your machine on high  on halogen-high and then switch to HID low?  If that's correct, when using high beam, are both the halogen and HID parts of the bulb operating?
2009 SYM HD200

Twigg

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2016, 04:04:37 AM »
A couple of notes ...

HID lighting can struggle with "always on" set-ups. The reason is that the ballasts will switch off if the voltage drops below about 9.5V. This is a protection circuit kicking in, and sometimes it is triggered when you hit the starter. The only way to fix it is to cycle the ignition ... and you see the problem. The solution is to wire a separate switch into the circuit to allow you to switch the lights on and off manually.

LEDs ...

The best way to accommodate those with fans is to cut out the center ring of the rubber boot and slide it over the bulb end before fitting the bulb. You can usually pull them back over the fan, but installing the clip can still be tricky for some. When you have done it on the right headlight of a Yamaha FJR, you will be an expert and your hand will heal in time :D

Beam patterns are different. Reflectors are optimized for halogen. They will produce a slightly different pattern with LED. You will lose the sharp cut-off and the beam will be more dispersed. This worries some but in 25000 miles last year on the FJR I was never flashed, even once, by oncoming motorists and I have two of them each producing 2200 lumens.

There is so much more light, and at a better temperature, that you can afford to adjust the low beams down a little and still be way better off.

As long as the fans do not fail the expected life of the bulb would be close to the expected life of the bike.

The power savings are considerable. I swapped two halogens for two LEDs. That was 120W and 3200 lumens for 40W and 4400 lumens. In my case that was a whole heated jacket for zero power. I actually have two additional LED Driving Lights that add 10000 lumens for 90W of power.

On the scooter you could swap out the low and high beams, and have sufficient power available to rewire the lights so that the low beam stayed on with the high beam ... Lots of light, just when you need it most and you would still be saving stator output.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 04:13:16 AM by Twigg »

scosgt

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2016, 10:24:50 AM »
Yes, I don't know which kit you used, but mine has a 35 watt halogen high beam. It is really just there for States that require a high beam, it does not put out that much light. However, you start the bike on high, and once running, the HID will light on the first or second try, and yes, it stays on with no issues. the high beam goes off when the HID is on. the halogen does work with a modulator, so that is an additional option in the day time. Even though it is low power, it does attract attention when flashing. And if a ballast or bulb should fail, it would probably get you home at night.
If you installed a kit with only one bulb that stays on with ignition, that would be an epic fail in these bikes. You usually can not start the bike with the HID lit, it needs to charge a bit to light up. Although when I had the 2012 EVO it must have had a really good battery, because it would light the HID with the engine off.

At Scosgt: So, the bulb you are using in your SYM HD200 is a combination halogen high beam/HID low beam?  You start up your machine on high  on halogen-high and then switch to HID low?  If that's correct, when using high beam, are both the halogen and HID parts of the bulb operating?

scosgt

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2016, 10:28:00 AM »
HID was a problem with a bike with FI and an ECU. It would need to be wired direct to the battery.
But on the HD 200 it is not a problem at all, once lit it never goes out.

A couple of notes ...

HID lighting can struggle with "always on" set-ups. The reason is that the ballasts will switch off if the voltage drops below about 9.5V. This is a protection circuit kicking in, and sometimes it is triggered when you hit the starter. The only way to fix it is to cycle the ignition ... and you see the problem. The solution is to wire a separate switch into the circuit to allow you to switch the lights on and off manually.

LEDs ...

The best way to accommodate those with fans is to cut out the center ring of the rubber boot and slide it over the bulb end before fitting the bulb. You can usually pull them back over the fan, but installing the clip can still be tricky for some. When you have done it on the right headlight of a Yamaha FJR, you will be an expert and your hand will heal in time :D

Beam patterns are different. Reflectors are optimized for halogen. They will produce a slightly different pattern with LED. You will lose the sharp cut-off and the beam will be more dispersed. This worries some but in 25000 miles last year on the FJR I was never flashed, even once, by oncoming motorists and I have two of them each producing 2200 lumens.

There is so much more light, and at a better temperature, that you can afford to adjust the low beams down a little and still be way better off.

As long as the fans do not fail the expected life of the bulb would be close to the expected life of the bike.

The power savings are considerable. I swapped two halogens for two LEDs. That was 120W and 3200 lumens for 40W and 4400 lumens. In my case that was a whole heated jacket for zero power. I actually have two additional LED Driving Lights that add 10000 lumens for 90W of power.

On the scooter you could swap out the low and high beams, and have sufficient power available to rewire the lights so that the low beam stayed on with the high beam ... Lots of light, just when you need it most and you would still be saving stator output.

Homer Sympson

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2016, 05:02:15 PM »
So, Northpilot and hsympson, how are your bulbs holding up? I just ordered one and I'm about to go on a long trip (1100 miles round trip) and I'd really like to know if you've had any problems.

To everyone who relayed info on here, thanks.

hsympson

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2016, 08:45:25 PM »
No issues so far.  One concern I have is that the rubber boot that seals the stock bulb in he headlight housing doesn't work with the LED but it hasn't been an issue yet.  I have done some couple to several hundred mile rides with it - I had thought of bringing the stock bulb as a spare but I haven't yet.

It seems like a big improvement to me and use less stator capacity.  I also replaced the rear non DOT turn signal dummy bulbs with LEDs, they work fine along with the stock signals on the DOT stalks.

Homer Sympson

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2016, 10:40:43 PM »
hsympson, good to know. Thanks.

Northpilot

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #28 on: November 22, 2016, 12:01:52 AM »
I have returned to SoCal from summer in Alaska, and have resumed riding the HD200.  I love the LED setup that Hsymson and I have installed, described above.  The HID solution was also good except for the startup issues mentioned above.  (Scosgt's HID setup with the halogen high beam seems to have solved the startup issues, and sounds like the way to go if you prefer HID.)

Having had both LED and HID, I prefer the LED to the HID: Wonderfully bright, but it seems no glare to oncoming traffic, simpler 'plug and play' installation, probably greater durability and, lower power drain which allows the installation of more electrical gear.

Either option, LED or HID, is quite an improvement over stock.
2009 SYM HD200

Homer Sympson

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Re: LED Replacement Headlight
« Reply #29 on: November 22, 2016, 12:28:30 AM »
Northpilot, thanks for the follow-up.